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Replies

  • Replying to @TEDTalks

    And yet, despite all this research into the importance of failure, our overly-conservative society still seeks to greatly penalize and eternalize it in various ways. We have made too many consequences too long-lasting, more than logic and science say they need to be.

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  • Replying to @mike4ty4 @TEDTalks

    E.g. poor grades can be used against you in hiring even decades down the line and no matter what you've learned. Criminal records can get you treated as a fresh con even after 30 years clean. "Zero tolerance" is lauded.

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  • Replying to @mike4ty4 @TEDTalks

    _Unintentional_ plagiarism can be as far-reaching in consequence as the intentional kind even if it may be that someone did it because they came from an unorthodox educational background and had less skill at, say, paraphrases.

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  • Replying to @mike4ty4 @TEDTalks

    We demand punctuality as a virtue and seek to convert foreign cultures to these "values" through our soft power by ridiculing them when people from them don't follow it because they treat time more flexibly by custom.

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  • Replying to @mike4ty4 @TEDTalks

    And to top it all off, we're paying for this with major costs to our physical and mental health, not to mention in traffic crashes.

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  • Replying to @mike4ty4 @TEDTalks

    We really need to develop a far more healthy relationship with failure, imperfection, contingency, nuance, and exception. It doesn't mean giving license, but rather wise flexibility. Balancing rule of law and rule of 德 [compassionate virtue], each checking the other's excess.

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